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47 Women's Inequality News Articles
from 2015 2nd Half
Click on the links below to get the full story from its source

12-28-15 Inside a women-only assembly in Pakistan
Inside a women-only assembly in Pakistan
In a remote part of Pakistan, one woman is trying to end centuries of discrimination. Tabassum Adnan has set up an all-women assembly known as a Jirga in Swat valley - challenging the dominant male one. "Some men say we should be beaten up." She overcame an abusive marriage to campaign for women's rights and has already been recognised by the US government for her work.

12-17-15 My year of reading and watching stories by anyone but white men
My year of reading and watching stories by anyone but white men
For 282 days in 2015, I vowed not to watch any movies or read any books that were created by white men from Western Europe, North America, or Australia. I was feeling particularly fed up when I made the decision. It was April 14, this year's National Equal Pay Day — the point that marks how far into the new year a woman must work to earn the same as a man did the previous year — and I had inequality on my mind. But when I started thinking about the art I consume — books and films, mostly — I realized that what I'd been enjoying had been mostly made by the same kind of person: white men from western countries. I decided practically on the spot that I was going to do my own modification of a nascent online movement and only spend money and time on films and books by women or people from outside of Western Europe and North America. Be the change you want to see in the world, right?

12-16-15 Japan top court upholds law on married couples' surnames
Japan top court upholds law on married couples' surnames
The Japanese Supreme Court has upheld a law that married couples must have the same surname, in a blow to women's rights activists. Campaigners have said the law was discriminatory as most couples end up using the husband's surname. However, the court said the law did not violate the constitution, public broadcaster NHK reported. It did, however, deem a separate law that stops women remarrying within six months of a divorce unconstitutional. Both sets of laws date back to Japan's 19th Century Meiji era. (Webmaster's comment: Staying in the Dark Ages.)

12-13-15 Prevention better than cure in Cuban healthcare system
Prevention better than cure in Cuban healthcare system
Imagine your doctor knocking at your door to give not just you, but your whole family, an annual health check-up. This is what happens in Cuba and although it might not go down well everywhere, it's a pro-active approach to healthcare that yields some impressive results. In terms of having healthy people, the Cuban health service outperforms other low and medium income countries and in some cases, outperforms much richer ones too. Despite spending a fraction of what the United States spends on healthcare (the World Bank reports Cuba spends $431 per head per year compared with $8,553 in the US) Cuba has a lower infant mortality rate than the US and a similar life expectancy. Webmaster's comment: Another example of the inferiority of the ignorant and arrogant American health system.)

12-13-15 Saudi Arabia: First woman councillor elected
Saudi Arabia: First woman councillor elected
A woman has won a seat on a municipal council for the first time in Saudi Arabia, after the kingdom lifted its bar on women taking part in elections. Salma bint Hizab al-Oteibi won a seat in Mecca province in Saturday's vote. Women have also won in several other regions in the country, including Jeddah and Qatif, reports suggest. The election was the first where women were allowed to vote and stand as candidates, and is being viewed as a landmark in the conservative kingdom. Saudi women still face many curbs in public life, including driving. A total of 978 women registered as candidates, alongside 5,938 men. Officials said about 130,000 women had registered to vote in Saturday's poll, compared with 1.35 million men.

12-12-15 Saudi Arabia's women vote in election for first time
Saudi Arabia's women vote in election for first time
Women in Saudi Arabia have cast their first votes in the country's history, in municipal elections. Women were also standing as candidates, another first, despite the conservative kingdom being the only nation where women are not allowed to drive. A total of 978 women have registered as candidates, alongside 5,938 men. Female candidates have had to speak behind a partition while campaigning or be represented by a man. Turnout was high, state media reported. (Webmaster's comment: Still a long, long way to go.)

12-11-15 U.S. maternal death rates rising
U.S. maternal death rates rising
Around the world, maternal mortality rates are falling dramatically. But not in the United States. New research conducted by the U.N.’s World Health Organization has found that the number of women in the U.S. dying from pregnancy-related complications is actually on the rise. In developed nations, women’s risk of dying as a result of pregnancy and childbirth has fallen 48 percent since 1990, to 12 women per 100,000 live births, The Washington Post reports. But death rates in the U.S. increased from 12 to 14 women per 100,000 live births over that same period—making our rate twice as high as Canada’s and more than four times higher than Greece’s and Iceland’s. (Webmaster's comment: The only thing that America leads the world in is Ignorance, Arrogance, and the means for killing people, including innocent men, women and children!)

12-11-15 The brain isn’t simply ‘male’ or ‘female’
The brain isn’t simply ‘male’ or ‘female’
Conventional wisdom holds that men and women’s brains are “wired” very differently. But a detailed new study has found that most brains have a mix of structures associated with traditional male and female traits and behavior, making every person an individual mosaic of gender-related characteristics.

12-11-15 Women in combat: The Pentagon says yes
Women in combat: The Pentagon says yes
Defense Secretary Ashton Carter last week announced that all military combat posts were now open to women, meaning that female troops can now drive tanks, fire mortars, lead infantry into battle, and fill any of the 220,000 military jobs previously open only to men. The new policy simply reflects the reality in Iraq and Afghanistan, where women “have been serving, dying, and getting decorated for their heroism” for 15 years. Now the U.S. can follow allies such as Israel, Canada, and several European countries that put women in combat roles. True gender equality “will make the military stronger.” (Webmaster's comment: And following Russia and China 75 years ago in 1940.)

12-3-15 US to open all combat roles to women, defence secretary says
US to open all combat roles to women, defence secretary says
US Defense Secretary Ash Carter has announced that all combat roles in the US military will be opened to women. The armed forces will have until next year to make the change. "America's force of the future," Mr Carter said, must be able to benefit from the "broadest possible pool of talent". The move will lead to some 220,000 openings to women, he said. Mr Carter is to give the armed services 30 days to submit plans to make the change. The US military has been easing restrictions over the past three years. (Webmaster's comment: 75 years after the Russians and Chinese did. Wow are we progressive!)

12-1-15 Young, geeky and black in Memphis
Young, geeky and black in Memphis
Facebook has more than one billion users and hires more than 1,000 people each year in the US. But in 2013, just one of these new employees was a black woman. Fewer than 2% of employees at Google, Twitter and Facebook are black. The tech industry is trying to tackle this diversity problem - but efforts are also being made at the grass-roots level. If you've ever read a profile of a successful US tech company, you've probably read a story like this: white men meet while studying at a prestigious university and start a business out of a garage. HP, Apple, Google, Amazon - all started by white men in garages. It's a story that inspires young tech entrepreneurs to follow in their path. But in places like Memphis, where two-thirds of the population is African-American, there are few role models to show young black girls that a successful career in tech is possible. "White guy, Oxford shirt, black slacks," recalls Audrey Jones. "The IBM uniform. That's what I thought a smart person looked like, not like me or anybody else that I knew."

11-30-15 Scans prove there's no such thing as a 'male' or 'female' brain
Scans prove there's no such thing as a 'male' or 'female' brain
Most people have a mix of male and female features in their brain, suggesting a person's cognitive skills can't be predicted by gender alone. You may have read that having a male brain will earn you more money. Or maybe that female brains are better at multitasking. But there is no such thing as a female or male brain, according to the first search for sex differences across the entire human brain. It reveals that most people have a mix of male and female brain features. And it also supports the idea that gender is non-binary, and that gender classifications in many situations are meaningless. “This evidence that human brains cannot be categorised into two distinct classes is new, convincing, and somehow radical,” says Anelis Kaiser at the University of Bern, Switzerland.

11-30-15 The woman who built a coffee empire from a small town
The woman who built a coffee empire from a small town
Elana Rosenfeld has built a coffee empire from a small town in rural British Columbia. Elana Rosenfeld was not even remotely prepared for her first wholesale orders. That was in 1996. Since then, Kicking Horse Coffee has become one of the biggest retail success stories in Canada, its distinct black packaging appearing in grocery stores and cafes across the country, as well as in the US. The company is tight-lipped about its finances, but expects to roast more than 1.3 million tons of coffee this year and has over 70 employees. And in 2012, marketing research firm AC Nielsen ranked it as one of the top ten commercial brands in Canada, alongside national stalwarts like bakery chain Tim Hortons.

11-29-15 100 Women 2015: Iranian women's fight for freedom
100 Women 2015: Iranian women's fight for freedom
Iran is better known for its religious conservatism than its history of women's rights. But although it might not be obvious to outsiders, women in Iran enjoy more freedom than many others in the Middle East. As well as having the right to vote, many are members of parliament. Unlike Saudi women they are allowed to drive, to work and participate in economic life. Most significantly, they make up more than 70% of students in Iran. But these freedoms were not achieved without the struggle and sacrifice of many extraordinary women. Women in Iran are taking photos of themselves without headscarves as part of an online campaign by journalist Masih Alinejad. Just 30 years after Estarabadi's primary school opened, the women became the first to enrol in university in Iran. (Webmaster's comment: What's really bizarre is that the freest arab country is the one United States treats as an enemy. Why? United States loves right-wing dictatorships. One person in charge, one bribe, and you get your corporations unlimited access to raw materials and labor with few, if any, enviromental or workplace rules. More money for our already rich.)

11-28-15 100 Women 2015: How can we stop unconscious bias?
100 Women 2015: How can we stop unconscious bias?
Aman and his son were in a car accident. The man died on the way to the hospital, but the boy was rushed inot surgery. The surgeon said: "I can't operate for that's my son!" We can't avoid making snap decisions about other people. Who is powerful or weak? Who is caring or aggressive? Who is trustworthy and who is competent? This is called unconscious bias and this cartoon shows it in action. At first glance we might be confused because we (wrongly) assume the surgeon is the father - who is now dead - it is in fact the mother. This is prejudice, and it is often wrong. But you should not feel guilty about this. These assumptions come from the ancient, unconscious part of our mind - the decisions are rigged before they are even made, and after all, the unconscious part of our mind has stood us in good stead over millions of years of evolution. It allows us to decide in a split second who is friend or foe, simply by assessing whether another person looks like us. It urges us to prefer the familiar and fear the unfamiliar. The trouble is, our friends and foes are no longer the same as they were for our remote ancestors.

11-27-15 100 Women 2015: The small band of pioneering women farmers in India
100 Women 2015: The small band of pioneering women farmers in India
I come from a state where agriculture is the biggest employer so I have vivid memories of fields full of women. But think about the owner - and it's always a man who comes to mind. Land is traditionally passed down the male line in India, so society tends to struggle with the idea of female farm owners. But this is starting to change as women challenge the stereotype. Also many women are being pushed into farming after their debt-stricken farmer husbands kill themselves. It is a rare sight in India to see women driving a tractor. This is the story of three women, separated by circumstance and geography, who have picked up the gauntlet and begun farming.

11-27-15 100 Women 2015: the female farmers unable to own their land
100 Women 2015: the female farmers unable to own their land
More than a third of the world's workforce works in agriculture and in developing countries, and women make up 43% of the workforce. But they comprise less than a fifth of landholders. Access to secure tenure and ownership of land is harder for women than men, and there is an imbalance in yields produced by male and female farmers because they lack equal access to resources such as seeds.

11-24-15 100 Women 2015: US' Arquette slams Hollywood pay gap
100 Women 2015: US' Arquette slams Hollywood pay gap
US actor Patricia Arquette reveals what happened after she called for pay equality in her Oscar acceptance speech earlier this year. When she looked at the data, she says: "It wasn't all about actresses - it actually also revealed that [in] other departments there was also great wage disparity - editors and sound mixers..." and so on but this is now changing. "Now if women take action, the company has to prove that they were not discriminating against them" she says.

11-24-15 Marium Mukhtiar, Pakistani female fighter pilot, dies in crash
Marium Mukhtiar, Pakistani female fighter pilot, dies in crash
A female Pakistani fighter pilot has died after her aircraft crashed in Punjab province. Marium Mukhtiar was on a routine training mission when her plane met an "in-flight emergency" over Mianwali district, the air force said. She and her co-pilot ejected. She later died from her injuries in hospital. Flying Officer Mukhtiar was one of a small number of women to work as fighter pilots in Pakistan, and the first to die on operational service. She told BBC News last year of her journey into a traditionally male-dominated world and desire to "do something different."

11-23-15 100 Women Live: Is news failing women?
100 Women Live: Is news failing women?
Email stories and comments to BBC100.Women@bbc.co.uk on Monday 23 November 2015. Research found women only make up 24% of people heard about in the news. Experts say it will take "at least three quarters of a century" to reach parity between the genders. Women are most visible in the news in North America and least visible in the Middle East.

11-19-15 Gender pay gap 'may take 118 years to close' - World Economic Forum
Gender pay gap 'may take 118 years to close' - World Economic Forum
The World Economic Forum believes it will take another 118 years - or until 2133 - until the global pay gap between men and women is finally closed. Women are only now earning the amount that men did in 2006, data from the WEF's Global Gender Gap report says. It says progress on closing the gap has stalled in recent years at a time when more women are entering the workplace. In fact, nearly a quarter of a billion more women are in the global workforce today than a decade ago. In several countries, more women are now going to university than men but - crucially - this is not necessarily translating into more women occupying skilled roles or leadership positions. (Webmaster's comment: In 2014 I calculated it would take 110 years in the United States.)

11-19-15 How equal are you?
How equal are you?
United States ranks 28 out of 145.

11-10-15 Afghanistan's first female conductor
Afghanistan's first female conductor
For many years, the Taliban banned music and the education of girls in Afghanistan - and although many women still find themselves restricted, one 17-year-old has become the country's first female conductor. What was so special about this concert - apart from the fact that it was an all-female ensemble playing music to a big audience in the middle of violence-ridden Kabul - was that it was led by the country's very first female conductor, 17-year-old Negin Khpolwak who is also a student here.

11-9-15 Marie Spartali Stillman: The female artist time forgot
Marie Spartali Stillman: The female artist time forgot
Being an artist in Victorian England was not an occupation considered suitable for a woman - one reason why there were so few of them. But Marie Spartali Stillman was an exception. She rose to prominence within the very male pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood and successfully sold her paintings on both sides of the Atlantic. Delaware Art Museum is staging the first major exhibition of her work - Poetry in Beauty - in an attempt to bring her the public recognition she deserves.

11-8-15 Pasteurising breast milk in Bangladesh
Pasteurising breast milk in Bangladesh
The World Health Organisation recommends that babies should be fed exclusively on breast milk for the first six months of life, and that mothers should continue to breastfeed until the child is two. But this is not always possible for women who have to return to work soon after the birth. In Bangladesh, where child under-nutrition is a major problem, a new solution is being offered to help mothers working in garment factories to feed their babies breast milk for longer, as Akbar Hossain reports.

10-29-15 Bradley Cooper says 'transparency' needed over Hollywood wage gap
Bradley Cooper says 'transparency' needed over Hollywood wage gap
Bradley Cooper has spoken of the need for "transparency" to help close the gender pay gap in Hollywood. Cooper's American Hustle co-star Jennifer Lawrence made headlines this month when she wrote about her anger at getting paid less than her male counterparts. "Putting a microscope on it and having the impact that it's had is a great thing," Cooper said."Obviously transparency is necessary in order to help that equilibrium occur."

10-23-15 Indonesia's Aceh introduces strict anti-gay law
Indonesia's Aceh introduces strict anti-gay law
Strict laws against homosexuality have come into effect in the conservative Indonesian province of Aceh. Gay sex between Muslim men or women, both locals and foreigners, can now be punished with 100 strokes of the cane. The law, passed in 2014 but only now being enforced, has faced opposition by rights groups. The strictly Muslim province has become increasingly conservative in recent years and is the only one in Indonesia allowed to implement Sharia law. Under the new laws, adultery also carries a possible penalty of 100 strokes. Those who accuse someone of adultery without proof could themselves face 80 lashes.

10-20-15 Does language reinforce the gender pay gap?
Does language reinforce the gender pay gap?
A new nation-by-nation comparison suggests language is a driver of gender inequality. American women who work full-time make, on average, 78 cents for every dollar earned by their male counterparts. How do we account for this? A 2007 study pointed to a variety of factors, including the industries and specific occupations women tend to choose (or are nudged into). But after taking such realities into account, more than 41 percent of the gap was still unaccounted for. Newly published research proposes one possible explanation, and it's as basic as you can get: the language we speak. An analysis by three University of Warsaw scholars finds that nations using relatively gender-neutral languages have a smaller gender wage gap. "We hypothesized that in countries where language has a more marked distinction between genders, differences in labor market outcomes will be larger," a research team led by Joanna Tyrowicz writes in the journal Economics Letters. "The results robustly confirm the hypothesis." Noting that "it is rarely questioned that language influences human behavior," the researchers examined "asymmetric treatment of genders in languages," ranging from rules of grammar to "idiomatic expressions that glorify one gender" and demean the other. The researchers note that some languages, such as French, link specific nouns to genders. Others, including English, use different pronouns for men and women ("his" and "hers"). In contrast, they write, "Mandarin or Finnish have no system of gender identification in the language."

10-19-15 The Indian women who took on a multinational and won
The Indian women who took on a multinational and won
This is the story of an extraordinary uprising, a movement of 6,000 barely educated women labourers who took on one of the most powerful companies in the world. The women have taken on not only the company that employs them but also the trade unions supposed to represent them. A group of semi-literate women had taken on the most powerful interests in the state and won. "We won't allow anyone to exploit us. Enough is enough."

10-17-15 More women researchers needed 'to deliver food security'
More women researchers needed 'to deliver food security'
Policy and business leaders have used a major food conference to highlight the need for more women in the global agriculture sector. Women account for only a small proportion of skilled scientists worldwide. One of the speakers, Chelsea Clinton, told delegates that women were a "crucial, vital and necessary" part of delivering global food security. Data shows that progress has been made in recent years, but there is still a long way to go to close the gender gap. The call for equality was made at the 2015 Borlaug Dialogue in the US. "Certainly, we are not on track at the moment to feed the population we expect to have around the world in 2050," Ms Clinton, vice-president of the Clinton Foundation, told the gathering. One of the themes of the three-day event, which focused on the "fundamentals of global food security", was inspiring young women to take up careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (Stem).

10-14-15 Claiming Delhi's streets to 'break the cage' for women
Claiming Delhi's streets to 'break the cage' for women
Young female students in the Indian capital, Delhi, are fighting to assert their right to public spaces with a campaign called Pinjra Tod (Break The Cage). The BBC's Geeta Pandey joins them for a night as they go out to "claim the streets" and fill them with their "dreams and desires". The issue that has brought all these men and women out on to the streets is what is called the "curfew hour" in women's hostels - the deadline by which residents must return to their rooms. "Curfews and deadlines in the name of providing protection and safety are actually mechanisms of reproducing patriarchy. We are saying this is not about women's safety really, this is about moral policing." Students say most women's hostels - whether run by the university or privately-owned - follow curfew hours. Some lock their gates as early as 6:30pm or 7:30pm while a few allow students to remain out until a little later. They say while curfew times are stringently enforced in women's hostels and those who break them run the risk of being expelled, hostels for men, which also have curfew hours on paper, rarely enforce them. Libraries and laboratories in the university are open until much later - till midnight or in some places, even until 2am - and curfew hours mean women have no access to them.

10-13-15 Jennifer Lawrence pens essay on Hollywood sexism
Jennifer Lawrence pens essay on Hollywood sexism
Jennifer Lawrence has written an essay expressing her anger at getting paid less than her male co-stars. In the article on Lena Dunham's site Lenny, she said: "I'm over trying to find the 'adorable' way to state my opinion and still be likable!" She said she only found how much less she was being paid when emails from Sony Pictures were hacked last year. "I didn't get mad at Sony. I got mad at myself. I failed as a negotiator because I gave up early," she said. (Webmaster's comment: Being "likable" finishes last! Being "nice" finishes last! Honk your own horn and demand what you have earned! And you're still trying to be likable. You should be MAD at Sony. Rip them up one side and down the other! Little girls are brought up to be likable. That way men can use and abuse you for your whole life and get away with it! They know that and keeping you ignorant of that is the objective of much of their treatment of you!)

10-13-15 'Too hot to be an engineer' - women mark Ada Lovelace Day
'Too hot to be an engineer' - women mark Ada Lovelace Day
On Ada Lovelace Day, four female engineers from around the world share their experiences of working in male-dominated professions. Now in its sixth year, the annual celebration of women working in the fields of science, technology, engineering and maths (Stem) is named after the woman now regarded as the world's first computer programmer. Ada Lovelace worked with the inventor Charles Babbage on his "analytical engine" creation in the 1850s - a mechanical computing device that he designed but never built. (Webmasters' comment: You Go Girl! Ignore all the stupid, ignorant men and Kick Ass!)

10-11-15 Inside the heroic effort to bring the internet to young women in Afghanistan
Inside the heroic effort to bring the internet to young women in Afghanistan
For many young women, this is life changing. The young women speak almost-fluent English, and any questions that risk being lost in the language barrier are handled by a translator. Some girls tell me they will become accountants; another, a poet; at least one young woman says she wants to be a computer programmer. One common thread throughout the conversation relates to their personal, not educational, journeys — a path that traces back to the Digital Citizen Fund, a nonprofit organization founded by Roya Mahboob, one of the country's first female IT CEOs and founder of software development firm Afghan Citadel. The Digital Citizen Fund provides internet and technology training classes for young women in high school classrooms. So far, the group has built 11 internet training facilities across Afghanistan. Students learn how to use social media, blogging, photography, and software, including design programs and Microsoft Office. Some students even learn basic coding skills to build simple applications.

10-9-15 Breaking out of Japan's male-dominated workplace
Breaking out of Japan's male-dominated workplace
When it comes to gender equality, Japan ranks 104th out of 142 nations, according to the World Economic Forum, significantly behind other advanced economies. The BBC's Mariko Oi set out to discover what working life is like for five women in Tokyo. (Webmaster's comment: United States ranks 20th.)

9-2-15 Working Women Still Lag Men in Opinion of Workplace Equity
Working Women Still Lag Men in Opinion of Workplace Equity
Twelve percent of women say they have been passed over for a promotion or other opportunity because of their gender at some point in their life, similar to the 15% who said this in 2013. By contrast, 5% of employed men, versus 8% two years ago, believe that being male has ever hindered their advancement. Gallup's Aug. 5-9 Work and Education survey also finds 17% of working women believing they have ever been denied a raise at work because of their gender, within the margin of error of the 13% who said this in 2013. This far exceeds the rate among working men, steady at 4%.

9-1-15 The Psychology of Entrepreneurs Drives Business Outcomes
The Psychology of Entrepreneurs Drives Business Outcomes
Smart leaders of countries and cities know that a thriving entrepreneurial sector is a key to economic growth and the creation of good jobs. In the U.S. alone, 50% of all jobs are in small businesses and approximately 65% of all new good jobs are created by them, according to the Small Business Administration. Finding and developing successful business builders is critical to any society that wants to thrive economically.

8-28-15 Are Pakistan’s female medical students to be doctors or wives?
Are Pakistan’s female medical students to be doctors or wives?
DIn Pakistan's prestigious medical schools, female students outshine and outnumber their male counterparts. However, many do not end up as practising doctors - and now there are calls to limit their numbers, the BBC's Amber Shamsi in Islamabad reports. A real patient, a woman, and the instructor invites several of the female students to examine her, since cultural sensitivities dictate that she does not want to be inspected by a man. The instructor has his pick, since there are 17 women and three men in this group of students. (Webmaster's comment: A backward primitive society with nuclear weapons.)

8-19-15 'Female Viagra': Libido pill Addyi approved by US drug agency
'Female Viagra': Libido pill Addyi approved by US drug agency
The US Food and Drug Administration has approved a libido-enhancing drug for women dubbed the "female Viagra". It has been criticised as having only marginal benefits. Unlike Viagra, which affects blood flow to the genitals, Addyi is designed to help women regain their sex drive by boosting levels of brain chemicals. Sprout said trials had shown an increase "in the number of satisfying sexual events", although experts suggest the test results were modest.

8-4-15 CEO Secrets: Harriet Green offers her key business advice
CEO Secrets: Harriet Green offers her key business advice
"Recruit people 'better than you'."

7-28-15 Jen Welter: Arizona Cardinals appoint NFL's first female coach
Jen Welter: Arizona Cardinals appoint NFL's first female coach
Jen Welter has become the first female coach in the NFL after being appointed by the Arizona Cardinals. The 37-year-old American has been hired as a linebacker coach for pre-season by Cardinals head coach Bruce Arians. He said it didn't matter if a coach was "the Green Hornet" as long as players felt he or she could help them improve. Welter, who spent 14 seasons as a professional American football player, added: "I'm honoured to be a part of this amazing team."

7-27-15 Why do Americans not take their holiday time?
Why do Americans not take their holiday time?
It's well known that people in the United States on average don't receive as much holiday time as their European counterparts. Studies show 25% of Americans do not receive any paid leave at all, and those who do rank behind their European counterparts. But what may be surprising is that US workers are also less likely to use the holiday time they do receive. This year four in 10 Americans do not intend to take all of their holiday time, partly in fear of losing their job or because it isn't encouraged by their employer. 1 in 4 Americans do not receive any paid leave. The US is the only country not guaranteeing vacation days. The EU guarantees 20 vacations days a year.

7-14-15 Women dependent on cocaine or meth have less grey matter
Women dependent on cocaine or meth have less grey matter
Women who have been addicted to stimulants have less grey matter in brain regions involved in reward, emotion and learning. Whether this is a cause or effect is unclear. Don’t do drugs, kids. Especially if you’re female. Women dependent on stimulants like cocaine and methamphetamine appear to have less grey matter, even after they stop using them. Weirdly, men’s brains don’t show this difference. (Webmaster's comment: Not sure where to include this news item. It is important for women to know but we have no Women's Health News webpage.)

7-11-15 Comic-Con: Women tired of groping geeks and credibility checks
Comic-Con: Women tired of groping geeks and credibility checks
The Fempire is striking back. Women who attend comic book conventions, many dressed as their favourite comic characters, are tired of being manhandled as they pose for photographs. And they're sick of having their geek credentials questioned. Once a world mainly inhabited by so-called "fanboys," Comic-Con's 130,000 attendees are now almost half female. And if a woman chooses to dress as her favourite superhero or villain, that can mean some skimpy outfits. It's not just Wonder Woman who fights crime in a tiny bodysuit and stilettos.

7-9-15 Jeb Bush: Americans 'need to work longer hours'
Jeb Bush: Americans 'need to work longer hours'
During a visit to New Hampshire on Wednesday, Jeb Bush was asked about his plans for tax reform. Mixed in with talk about an ambitious goal of 4% US economic growth was a bit of advice that left the Republican presidential candidate scrambling to explain himself. "We have to be a lot more productive, workforce participation has to rise from its all-time modern lows," Mr Bush told the editors of the New Hampshire Union Leader in an interview that was broadcast online. "It means that people need to work longer hours and, through their productivity, gain more income for their families. That's the only way we're going to get out of this rut that we're in." (Webmaster's comment: Nevermind that in many Europeon nations people work less hours and get more vacation time and have a higher standard of living. Jeb Bush is making this appeal for the support of the rich, he's encourging the U.S. workers to work longer and harder so the rich can get more money. So be a good obedient little worker bee and work harder!)

7-5-15 World Cup: Do men or women rule US football?
World Cup: Do men or women rule US football?
Soccer isn't a sport traditionally associated with American excellence - for a start the rest of the world calls it football. But in this year's World Cup, the women's team has had a great run. On Sunday they face Japan in the final. If they win, it will be their third World Cup victory. The US men's team can't make that claim - but their stars make much more money than the women.

7-1-15 Caitlyn Jenner makes Woman's Hour Power List
Caitlyn Jenner makes Woman's Hour Power List
Trans woman Caitlyn Jenner has made this year's Woman's Hour Power List of top 10 influencers, alongside Angelina Jolie, singer Sia and Anna Wintour. The list, topped by Scottish first minister Nicola Sturgeon identifies women who have had an "exceptionally large impact".

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47 Women's Inequality News Articles
from 2015 2nd Half

Women's Inequality News Articles from 2015 1st Half